Skip to main content

About your Search

20130124
20130201
STATION
MSNBC 8
MSNBCW 8
CNN 4
CNNW 4
KPIX (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
investing in a greener future for the environment and the economy. president obama may have shown signs he is ready to do that in the second inaugural address. >> we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. the path toward sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the power of jobs and technologies. we must claim its promise. >> strong, clear words from a president considered not green enough by environment lists in his first term. it's true, the president has a lot of work to do but instead of chastising him, maybe it's time for the green movement itself to reimagine what it ought to look like. the modern green movement must be an inclusive one and close the green gab that exists between national and environmental organizations and justice organizations. the environmental problems in inner cities and rural areas ok pied by low income communities of color deserve as much attention as the fracki
about a great deal about the deteriorating threat environment in libya. you know, when i landed in tripoli, i was met by the zintan militia. that was the welcome i had. all these guys, dressed completely in black, holding their automatic weapons. that was my welcoming party. >> rubio told fox news last night, time will tell whether some of the things she said will bear out to be true or not. these things have a way of flushing themselves out. overall, clinton's political strengths were clearly on display. she was prepared, tough when she needed to be, deferential when she wanted to be, and she displayed both raw emotion and a sense of humor. it's also worth noting that she's stronger today, politically, than she was four years ago. consider, she's leaving office with the highest approval ratings of her political career, 67%, according to a "washington post"/abc poll. we had her at 69 in the nbc news/"wall street journal" poll. a whopping 91% of democrats approve of the job he's done, and that fervor was on vivid display, as senate and house democrats fell all over themselves enc
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
visible moments of hillary clinton's senate career when she was the leader of the environment and pickup works committee. and what you saw her do on the witness stand today she did as a senator in the committee. she had drilled down into such detail, into issues that you and i and most of the viewers tonight would not be interested in. and so she exhibited something today that is just part of her dna, and her ability to really know thoroughly something so that people like ron johnson and rand paul and hers who tried to throw her off her game. they looked embarrassing. this is not only somebody who is one of the most popular politicians in the country, but somebody who for obvious reasons had drilled down so deeply into this issue that they were the ones that began to look immature, versus a very profound, capable, person that hillary clinton displayed. >> steve, i am so glad you mentioned public works, because that is a lot of what people consider very boring stuff. i used to be the chief of staff of that committee, and i can attest to a certain amount of bore hearings. barbara boxers, o
that in some cases led to that environment. >> goldie, do you agree with that? >> absolutely have to agree with that. you know, the proliferation of military rapes, assaults on women, willed soldiers, women marines, women sailors are more likely to be sexual assaulted by their own brethren than they are the enemy. that's the plain fact of the matter and many of those cases are covered up. those women are sent home and those money are dent to duty station to duty station and their careers move on. it's been a long time since a woman joined the military. women have been fighting this good fight a very, very long time. there are relatives of mine, cousins and brothers, who are retired navy officers. they are retired air force. they served in the naef. i'm the only marine in the family. i think that says something about my mindset on this thing. my brother said that i was crazy. he's probably right about that. >> oh, you're not crazy, goldie. you're not crazy. >> i think it takes -- but i think that the criteria for me and the criteria for every woman and man who serves ought to be the same, a
question and they always say it's about packaging and the environment changes and then they move up and the other guys move down. >> you mentioned messaging and policy, and what you did not mention was mess efrenger and i generally the pieces that are front and center. >> i asked a question earlier that i just basically ripped off from you so you would be proud. >> thanks. >> chairman rinse priebus just reelected every two years, here what he said about the republican renewal. >> we must compete in every state in every region, building relationships with communities we haven't before. at the rnc, we are dropping the red and blue state analysis. we must be a party concerned about every american in every neighborhood. >> the rhetoric, we've heard a lot of from different members of the gop, but here's my question, molly. how did priebus get another two years after such a bad year for republicans? >> there is a strong feeling among republicans that whatever happened in november was not reince priebus' fault, it was not the rnc's fault. a lot of it is blamed on the romney campaign which
, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root. our interests suffer. our security at home is threatened. >> i think she is trying to warn the administration and the world that we cannot retreat from this engagement here. and right now, overnight, we've seen that the u.s. is doing refueling of french fighters in mali, which is very troublesome to some. it is a much more aggressive posture. but the uk has taken all of their nationals out of somalia overnight. this area of north africa as bob and ted were just saying is the most dangerous perhaps in the world, aside from pakistan and afghanistan which are nuclear armed against each other. and pakistan and india nuclear armed against each other and what's happening in afghanistan as we retreat and the effect on that and north korea. so they have to really not just look at immigration and guns and the budget as the next challenges here. >> have we figured out, senator, what the balance is between invasions, nation building, a huge commitment on the part of the united states in this part of the world, and t
to keep the cement floors warm for man's best friend. >> it's a stressful environment. we're trying to keep them as comfortable as we can. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh, when a water main broke in the middle of the night, single digit temperatures turned gushing water into a sheet of ice. subzero temps aren't all bad if you like ice boating. skimming across the ice at speeds up to 60 miles an hour in what looks like a mini kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up really like double bundle, i'm good. i have a lot of clothes on. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> reporter: and the forecast high there today, 77 degrees. now, by contrast, in gaithersburg, maryland, yesterday dangerous for a cell phone worker who was up on a tower about 200 feet high when all of a sudden his hands went numb, his legs cramped up and a co-worker had to climb up to rescue him. he was treated at the hospital for hypothermia, but he'll be okay, so be careful out there. soledad. >> my goodnes
friend. >> it's a stressful environment. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh when a water main broke in the middle of the night, single digit temperatures gushing watt near a sheet of ice. subzero temps aren't all bad if you like ice boating. skimming across the ice at speeds of up to 60 miles an hour in what looks like a menny kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up, double bundle, i'm good. i have a lot of clothes on. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> reporter: ah, yes, key largo, been there many a time. let's look at the lowest temperatures overnight across the united states. check these out, mt. washington, new hampshire, 34 below, crane lake, minnesota, 27 below, sayre knack lake, new york, minus 23 and presque isle, maine, haven't been there yet, 23 below zero. out. we are balmy here by comparison. >> it's quite nice here and we should be counting our blessings. the folks we worry are the homeless. what are cities doing to help those who have absolutely nowher
. >> precisely. the challenge is when you have cognitive, how does human work? you sense the environment. you pick up a coffee cup. yes, they will actually be the capability to mimic, feel. so if you're out on the web, you can literally feel the fabric you're going to purchase. >> you have computers becoming more sensory in the application. touch, scent. >> smell. i think about smell. it's not just that your morning coffee is great. smell is imagine for a minute you sneeze. well, there's all sorts of chemicals there. what if one of the things you could detect was staff infection. literally if you sneeze your cell phone says oh by the way, you want to hick the doctor because you're going to be unbelievably sick. >> you're going to die. no hopefully you won't go that far. taste, also one of the things you can do. >> exactly. you're familiar with pandora, thumbs up thumbs down. imagine having dinner and you have your device sensor sitting there and you smell what it smells. it will learn enough about the chemistry what it is to actually suggest it. >> you're running down th
, in a professional environment, they've got to think about themselves like a professional. and the other is don't worry about the paycheck. yes, my book is called all work, no pay, it's a joke, but if you're an unpaid intern you should only be working 12 to 15 hours per week at a structured, structured, safe environment, but if it's -- if you're choosing between a paid opportunity, and an unpaid opportunity, it's not about the paycheck, it's about the experience. which is going to be more beneficial for you and help you after you graduate. >> tucker: smart advice. >> ainsley: and a tip he she was clayton's intern at one time. see you're doing well. >> thank you. >> ainsley: and farmers selling products without a permit, but they are not going down without a fight. we'll explain. great segment. [ female announcer ] your smile. like other precious things that start off white, it yellows over time. fact is, when it comes to your smile, if you're not whitening, you're yellowing. crest 3d white whitestrips go below the enamel surface to whiten as well as $500 professional treatments, at a fraction o
like he does will have to be more comfortable with that sport as it pushes toward a safer environment with less violence. we will witness what it look like a week from now. it is one topic the president was comfortable weighing in on. >> a couple of new insights from the president there. white house correspondent peter alexander, thank you so much. >>> new today, renewed fights over how to deal with the federal budget. dick durbin is defending what president obama said in his inauguration speech. >> what i heard the president say was programs like social security, medicare and medicaid, critically important for our future and we need to have a bipartisan commitment to make them work. bob and i have been in a lot of meetings talks about deficit reductions. i think we need reform in these programs that means they will live on to serve future generations. that's the message i took from the president. >> former republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan said the gop needs to recommend at this times approach with voters looking forward. >> we have to expand our appeal. we had to expan
that and driving? >> sure. well, you know, we all -- a lot of us work in office environments, and he talks about mondays. today's a monday morning. it's raining here in virginia this morning. that sort of drudgery sometimes of going through the office. this character in the spot named dave has a different kind of take on life, and the transformative moment is the fact that he drives a vw. and when he exposes other people to that experience, it changes their disposition too. so that's really the turning point, if you will, in the spot. >> the ad cost $7.6 million to run it on super bowl sunday. it will be interesting. you have a question? >> i want to be a one person jamaican focus group here. i was born in jamaica. i was wondering, did you testt with any actual jamaicans? although i love you using jimmy cliff, a famous jamaican performer, the jamaican accent had a jar jar binks attitude. and anyone who saw "cool runnings" understands that. >> we talked to several jamaicans, and we had a speech coach to make sure it was authent authentic. we collaborated with jimmy on the spot. we took someone wh
making sure we're stable and have a good environment to be around. it's been a long process, but definitely a learning one and a good one. >> and finally, a lot of people have talked about in women's tennis why can't the u.s. produce more competitive women's tennis players. after it the williams' sister, they's been a big gap. do you think your emergence is a sign that americans are finally producing the quality players again? >> yeah, i think it's a good sign. even after me, there's a lot of other girls that are below me that are still coming up and playing great tennis and i think it's a really good sign that i'm in top 20 now and there are a lot of girls in the top 100 trying to get that break through. and i think until venous and serena retire, we don't have anything to worry about. when they're gone and they need someone to replace, i think there will be plenty willing to step in. >> sloan stevens again congratulations and please come talk to us again when you break number ten in the world. >> of course i will. >> take care. >>> so sloan stevens is my new favorite athle
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)